Without words

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THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “Regarding (Most) Songs” by Thomas Lux: voice, sing, trills, banal, primal, dumb, without, means, noise, plaintive, joyful, words

Voice singing many joyful words
So plaintive to see some dark clouds
Primal means from the clouds and birds
In the form of rising mounds shrouds

Without words think of looming gloom
Banal trills coming from the crowds
Cotton clouds bring hope I assume
In the form of rising mounds shrouds

Noise from faraway one can hear
Hope of better days as bright clouds
I see you soon to give me cheer
In the form of rising mounds shrouds

Voice singing many joyful words
In the form of rising mounds shrouds*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

* A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be:

AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.

For: Sunday Photo Fiction – November 20th 2016, Whirligig 86 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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I gaze at the tidewater

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This week’s photo prompt is provided by Barb CT of the blog, Gallimaufry. Thank you Barb!

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “A Village Cat” by Anne Porter: living, under, decorated, daubs, smudges, streaks, clown, carnival, gaze, wonder, back, eyes

I gaze at the tidewater and I wonder when

Wisteria by the sea as I daub my eyes then

I step back living under penetralia

The breeze occur as I wait for a faceless huh

Streaks of fake joy like a carnival cha-cha

Smudges of sharp guilt of a clown drama

Mute prayer as I look for you at the delta

My guts tell me it comes in different forms, karma

As seagulls fly over me I reflect my Zen

I look at the sea and hope to see you again*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

* The Duo-rhyme, a poetic form created by Mary L. Ports, is a 10 or 12-line poem, with the first two and last two lines having the same rhyme scheme, and the center of the poem (lines #3 through #8 or #10) having their own separate monorhyme scheme.

Meter: 8 beats per line, written in iambic tetrameter (4 linear feet of iambic) Rhyme Scheme: 10-line: a,a,b,b,b,b,b,b,a,a and 12-line: a,a,b,b,b,b,b,b,b,b,a,a

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For: FFfAW Challenge – Week of November 15, 2016 by Priceless Joy, Sunday Photo Fiction – November 13th 2016, Wordle #129 “November 14th, 2016”, Whirligig 85 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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The City’s Splendour

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THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “The Wild Swans at Coole” by William Butler Yeats: woodland, twilight, count, wheeling, lighter, lover, passion, wander, drift, edge, pool, find

as the lovers wander through the woodland, they drift
they were wheeling and walking in passion, a gift
trying to get out of the woods before twilight
find themselves at the edge of the woods, such delight

walking around the city as they count their steps
avoiding the guards marching so they sidestep
with horses and guards march by the palace, great sight
they have reached the edge of the woods, what a delight

the city so charming, they fell in love with it
lots of interesting places, they have to admit
at night, all the lights are on and everything’s bright
they have reached the edge of the woods, what a delight

cruising along the River Thames is also fun
one way to reach Greenwich and that’s what they have done
passing by the Tower Bridge and the Parliament
don’t forget the Shard almost directly in front

several of the city’s skyscrapers are there
they won’t miss Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square
people walking and chatting, city so vibrant
museums to see, places to eat on the front

holding hands in Hyde Park and the weather’s so good
watching people hither and thither as they stood
eating ice-cream from the place they love to frequent
they have to queue as children are happy in front

bright colourful flowers float in Canary Wharf
some art was there with characters that can be morphed
they were entertained, creation was so brilliant
they have reached the edge of the woods, what a delight

the lovers enjoy holiday in the city
they go home content after their shopping spree
people walking and chatting, city so vibrant
they have to queue as children are happy in front*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

* The La’ritmo, created by Laura Lamarca, consists of 8 4-line stanzas. Each line MUST contain 12 syllables.

Rhyme scheme is as follows: aabb ccbB ddbB eeff ggfF hhfF iibB jjfF

The repetition of 4th line in each stanza can either be an exact repetitive line, or a variation with the exact same end-rhyme word.

The form was created by me, Laura Lamarca, but was officially named by Chandni Hingorani. “La” is Laura Lamarca’s signature and “ritmo” in Italian, simply means “rhythm”. 

For: Sunday Photo Fiction – October 23rd 2016, Whirligig 82 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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Grandma’s Lamps

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PHOTO PROMPT © Rochelle Wisoff-Fields

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “Just One God” by Deborah Cummins: many, track, skyward, porcelain, flawed, birth, desire, ancestral, prayer, morning, bread, skillet

Light flicks skyward by the two lamps
In our ancestral home
A morning prayer in the damp
Meditate with shalom
Life might be flawed but I accept
My desire to heal as I wept
Life might be flawed
Life might be flawed
I’d be good, a promise I kept

As I fry eggs on skillet
Bread bakes in the oven
On a porcelain dish, some nuts
Breakfast for many – done
I am quite on track this morning
Waiting for what the day will bring
I’m quite on track
I’m quite on track
Preparing, frying and baking

The two lamps give a cosy feel
Grandma gave them to us
Giving us light in every meal
Give a sense of calmness
Loving memories in our lives
With us from birth till we were fives
Loving memories
Loving memories
From the photos in our archives*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

* The Trijan Refrain, created by Jan Turner, consists of three 9-line stanzas, for a total of 27 lines. Line 1 is the same in all three stanzas, although a variation of the form is not to repeat the same line at the beginning of each stanza. In other words, the beginning line of each stanza can be different. The first four syllables of line 5 in each stanza are repeated as the double-refrain for lines 7 and 8. The Trijan Refrain is a rhyming poem with a set meter and rhyme scheme as follows:

Rhyme scheme: a/b/a/b/c/c/d,d refrain of first 4 words of line five /c

Meter: 8/6/8/6/8/8/4,4 refrain/8

For: Friday Fictioneers by Rochelle, Whirligig 81 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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If I were to write a novel

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THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “Autumn Song” by Daniel Mark Epstein: flower, danger, torn, gobbled, regrets, brindled, fleeting, cargo, leaving, tongues, hearts, everyone

If I were to write a novel
All the intrigues but then blissful
Some with regrets and with torn hearts
Brindled and fleeting on some parts

With flowers and dangers for some
Nothing left unturned, not a crumb
Gobbled up by conflict, top of the chart
Bridled and fleeting on some parts

A cargo full of eclectic and exciting bits
Can’t wait to publish, hope it’s such a hit
I hope it’s got some lessons to impart
Bridled and fleeting on some parts

If I were to write a novel
Bridled and fleeting on some parts*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

* A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be:

AabB, ccbB, ddbB, AB -or- AbaB, cbcB, dbdB, AB.

For: Sunday Photo Fiction – October 9th 2016, Whirligig 80 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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Tale Weaver #86, September 22: “I wanna be a paperback writer.”

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “Summer’s Almost Gone” by William Trowbridge: spreading, hops, gourd, capsules, pollen, hottest, crooked, former, intervene, shoplifting, katydids, scorched

The hottest day of the season
Hearing the katydids was fun
Spreading hops as I spun
The gourd was gone, the gourd was gone

She gave him a crooked smile
Shoplifting as she walked the aisle
Good thing he intervened her guile
She’s got style, she’s got style

Some pollen got scorched in the sun
This story was full of action
With a former spy and his gun
Can’t move, I’m stunned, can’t move, I’m stunned*

* The monotetra is a new poetic form developed by Michael Walker. Each stanza contains four lines in monorhyme. Each line is in tetrameter (four metrical feet) for a total of eight syllables. What makes the monotetra so powerful as a poetic form, is that the last line contains two metrical feet, repeated. It can have as few as one or two stanzas, or as many as desired.

Stanza Structure:

Line 1: 8 syllables; A1
Line 2: 8 syllables; A2
Line 3: 8 syllables; A3
Line 4: 4 syllables, repeated; A4, A4

For: Tale Weaver #86, September 22: “I wanna be a paperback writer.”, Whirligig 78 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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Under the sea

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THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “The Mermaids” by Marianne Boruch: spell, concept, offering, badass, whale, dolphin, murderous, whimsy, core, singing, expanse, steely

Under the sea where the steely whale lives

And all the sea creatures living collectives

Fighting with the badass dolphin, that’s the concept

Such an adventure to see being such a nympholept

Quite murderous, in the expanse of the sea

More, more action, I shout as I swim spree

Not a whimsy offering, no singing and dancing

The sound of water flowing over stones babbling

Under the sea, quite a spell if you ask me

That’s quite fun, as in the sea I’m free

For: Whirligig 77 by Magical Mystical Teacher. Also for: Water Monitoring Day

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The Stream – Sunday Photo Fiction

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from puzzle books, of which Jae Rose is fond: shape, milk, feet, play, bird, car, dirt, love, brick, theme, diary, pumpkin

My feet brought me to this dirt
Don’t know why it gives me comfort
A creek where no one swims
Is this society’s urban paradigm?

No children playing
Nor dogs barking
Even birds have departed
All we see is flood and mud

People left their rubbish
After eating chips with fish
Milk cartons and bricks
Just to get their kicks

Sometimes even shopping carts
Development thwarted
Left my car, diary not so full
When my mind so roomful

Time to think, to reflect
Perhaps there’s a new prospect
On love, work and other themes
While I’m walking by the stream

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

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For: Sunday Photo Fiction – September 4th 2016 and Whirligig 75 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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Thursday Photo Prompt – reflection #writephoto

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “The Poet As Hero” by Siegfried Sassoon: scornful, harsh, old, silly, cry, serene, infant, dreams, senseless, smite, absolution, songs

A harsh reality dwells in this well
And with his sword he smites the water
Such senseless act, perhaps silly, one can tell
An absolution he requires for his errs
An old song, a serene cry for what befell
And with a scornful fleeting look, he stirs
What happens to this man and his reflection?
An ashen figure for what he has done*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

*A Ottava Rima is a poem written in 8-line octives. Each line is of a 10 or 11 syllable count in the following rhyme: one octive poem. abababcc

reflection

For: Thursday Photo Prompt – reflection #writephoto Posted on September 1, 2016 by Sue Vincent and Whirligig 74 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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Patiently Waiting

THIS WEEK’S WORDS come from “The Graves” by Joanna Klink: flicker, anchor, water, minor, blur, tender, clear, laughter, unwinding, hovering, rushing, leaning

Flickering in the water
She’s a peaceful ambler
Blurred sinking lantern
A glimpse of him she yearned

No laughter, that’s clear
If he could just appear
No rushing nor hovering
Just patiently waiting

No need for anchor
Just a bit of glimmer
Tender wind leaning
Never stops hoping

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

For: Photo Challenge #127 and Whirligig 73 by Magical Mystical Teacher

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