#SoCS Nov. 26/16 “pretty”

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Is the fairy godmother giving you a dress?
The bad stepmother might like to confess
Perhaps the evil witch brew her cauldron?
All I want are sausages, cheese and bacon
There’s a sleeping princess up there
Prince Charming coming from nowhere
The pretty princess might wake up
True love’s kiss wakes her up

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He glimpsed a figure standing in the shade
A lady in pink and her hair all braid
The wind blew, black hair down her sides cascade
Who was she and why was she in the greyed?
Was she in trouble and needed some aid?
She’s so pretty, he wants to serenade
Was it all a dream as the figure fades?

ColorfulButterflyAni

happy butterfly
flutters around the square
balance of the soul

exquisite colours
rainbow in a butterfly
pleasurable day

swaying butterfly
like lively ballet dancer
spins with the wind

pretty butterfly
wings beating the summer air
frail and delicate

For: The Friday Reminder and Prompt for #SoCS Nov. 26/16

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Chaotic – Daily Prompt

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It was chaos in the Jones’ household. The night before the holiday and everyone was packing their suitcases.

“Mum, I can’t find my pink blouse and my trainers, do you know where they are?” shouted Marie from her room.

“Aren’t you packing your stuff?” I asked Martin, who was playing his PS4. “How long are we going to be there?” he asked coolly.

“Mickey wants to come, too” Jaime came to my room with his favourite toy. “OK, darling, put him there.”

“Don’t forget to pack my binoculars, Dear” reminded my Honey.

And so the suitcase lay open.

PHOTO PROMPT © Ron Pruitt
PHOTO PROMPT © Ron Pruitt

When we first got married, Him Indoors and I visited the Philippines. We flew to Bicol, one of the provinces in the north of the Philippines and on the way back, flights were cancelled. Instead of waiting for the next flight which could be the next day or the next week, things could be very flexible in the Philippines. Anyway, we decided to take the bus to Manila. Everyone seemed to have the same idea. The bus station was full of people, chickens, pigs, children, cargoes, you name it, they were there, chaos! We ended up being in a decrepit, no air-con bus. We had to stand the first couple of hours. Did I mention that the bus was so full, people were literally hugging each other, not forgetting all the chickens, pigs, baskets of fruits and vegetables, etc. There was a stop – wheel fell off. We waited 3 hours for the man to get nuts in another town. We stood by the side of the road in the middle of the night. People started getting out, so we were able to sit. Then we stopped the second time – puncture on one of the tyres. Another wait. After that, the driver raced another bus along the motorway with a horse and a cart in the slow lane. Never again, we promised. Such a bus experience!

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This week’s photo prompt is provided by Iain Kelly. Thank you Iain!

Marie and son John were on the way to school when a car overtook them. Marie’s car skidded and rolled down the cliff. Luckily, both of them were able to get out of the car before the car caught fire. The man who overtook them saw the smoke, felt guilty and called the ambulance. The paramedics arrived and assessed the situation. They rang the emergency helicopter so they could take Marie and John to the nearest hospital.

Meanwhile, Sam found the surprise birthday present from his Dad. It was a drone cyber flyer plane, the one he saw in the shop. His Dad remembered! How happy he was and immediately set it up and started flying it. Then he couldn’t control it anymore and hit the front of the emergency helicopter. The helicopter crashed and chaos ensued.

For: Chaotic

Other “chaotic” posts:
https://sonjabenskinmesher.wordpress.com/2014/09/30/chaos/
https://annapurani93.wordpress.com/2016/11/24/chaotic/
https://lanternwords.wordpress.com/2016/11/24/be-not-chaotic/
https://sassyeasycook.wordpress.com/2016/11/24/turnaround/
Daily Prompt: Chaos cures boredom

Lord We Thank You by Raymond A. Foss

Lord, We thank you for this day,
for the joy of the morning,
the love of this family, waking from slumber
in this house, this home you have provided,
going out into the world, to college, to school,
to work, into the world, not of this world,
for you have touched our hearts and our lives,
have cleaned some of the grime of this life,
some of our scar tissue, to give us peace.
Grant us peace this day Lord, watch over us
be with us on the path you have laid before us
this day we pray our creator and sustainer
help us focus on what we must do today,
help us be satisfied, gratified, with what we do
in your name today Lord.
Give us strength for today and rest tonight Lord
so we may do your will and your work
today and the rest of our lives as individuals
as a family in your name
Amen

September 13, 2007 10:52

Thank you all for the follows —– 1000 followers – yay!!!

For: Nurturing Thurs – Thank You!, Creativity Challenge Day 4

Weekly Smile 47 #weeklysmile

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Hello everyone! Santa came early for Him Indoors – he’s got a new car – yay!!! We got it yesterday and this weekend, we are planning to drive to Tegernsee, which is a town in the Miesbach district of Bavaria, Germany. It is located on the shore of Tegernsee lake, at an elevation of 747 m above sea level. The town has its origins in the Tegernsee Abbey, which was founded in 746. Looking forward to test driving the new jag.

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Got a bit of a mishap today. This morning, I woke up thinking I was superwoman and started tidying up, washing clothes, sorting stuff, etc before I went to work. I put the washing on, thinking that when I get home, I’ll be able to hang them to dry. Me, being me, forgot to empty the pockets before putting them in the machine. It just so happen that Him Indoors’ mobile phone was still in his trousers, so it has been washed. Needless to say, the phone was useless so I went to town to buy him a new one (before he got home from work). Got him a new phone and now he’s very happy with his new toy.

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It has been relatively warm in Bavaria, like spring, so that’s my third smile, a lovely weather, where we can walk around the village, and glad that winter decided to come a little bit later or has given us a week of sunny weather. We just have to wait for next week, might be another story. Cheers everyone and enjoy your day/week.

What made you smile this week?

For: Weekly Smile 47 #weeklysmile, Hello There… Echoes of my neighbourhood, Three Things Thursday: Thanksgiving Day!

Anticipation – Daily Prompt

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“Ladies and gentlemen, we’ll be landing in half an hour. So please fasten your seatbelts, put your chair in an upright position and secure all baggage underneath your seat or in the overhead compartments…Enjoy the rest of the flight.” That was the captain speaking. Luzviminda could hardly contain herself. She was coming back home after four years of being away from everyone. She left a girl, now she was coming back a well travelled lady and a fiancée. She couldn’t believe all the experience she had in those four years.

After college Luzviminda was lucky enough to be invited by her aunt to travel to France and stay with them. It was in the winter and she could still remember the delight of first seeing snow. She asked her aunt to take a photo of her and sent it to her family. France is totally different from her country and she had to learn fast. She had to learn French to start with, so she watched all comedy shows and cartoons and tried to learn the language. She also started looking for a job. It wasn’t easy but she persevered. Luckily, she managed to get a job in one of the Consulates in Geneva. Her knowledge of English got her the job, as she was doing the English correspondence, while the others were doing the French and the Amharic ones. She loved that experience.

Then, after a while, she applied to do an apprenticeship in one of Germany’s chemical company. Actually, she applied to hundreds of companies in Europe. That was one determined lady! She was accepted to do the apprenticeship in the Inorganic Department. There, she met her future husband. After six months, they had to part their ways, as he had to go back to finish his studies and Luzviminda decided to visit her father in the USA.

In America, Luzviminda found a job in a Cosmetic Company, doing the Accounts Payable. They loved her there and were impressed with her ability to learn the job well and precise. The future husband followed her there and spent summer with her. They decided to get married in the UK in a year’s time. So Luzviminda decided to go back home and informed her mother and siblings.

“I can’t wait to tell them about my experiences. I can’t wait to see them all again. Life has been good to me. And now before I start a new life, I’d like to go home first, say thanks for everything that happened and get my Mother’s blessing. Half an hour more and I’ll be home!”

For: Anticipation

Other “anticipation” posts:
Well, what do you know?
Wordless Wednesday: Anticipation
https://loisajay1213.wordpress.com/2016/11/23/daily-prompt-anticipation/
https://wordsonwingsblog.wordpress.com/2016/11/23/the-meeting/
https://26letterspoetryblog.wordpress.com/2016/11/23/train-window/

Acceptance

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In a land of sadness, broken dreams are made
Which strip away any vital connection
And life was gravely portrayed
His name no longer mentioned

Of empty sheets and promises
No sense in carrying on
When everything is aimless
I’ve been conned and he’s gone

When poems are so melancholic
His name no longer part of my speech
Life could be mysterious and cryptic
Acceptance could be beseeched

While firmly grasping the goblet by the stem
I used to be happy and carefree
He could no longer be condemned
I just have to accept that I’m free

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Shake the ache I feel
Lengthen the strength of my soul
Pain still stains spirit
Not fault to put salt on wound
Not too much to touch your heart

Now I have my strength
Things are springing brightly
Not blame anyone
Things happened for a reason
Acceptance is a great balm

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rain, rain go away
why can’t the day be sunny
when we want to walk

guess nature is right
acceptance is essential
good for soil and plants

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Luningning always felt that there was something missing from her life. She couldn’t get satisfied or complete, no matter how much she achieved or did. She asked her mother. She knew she was adopted when she was a baby and she loved her new family. They treated her as one of their own and have given her love and acceptance. She asked for the name of her biological mother and the name of the hospital where she was born. To her surprise, there were two baby girls born from the same woman. She has a twin sister, who was also adopted when the mother died at giving birth to them. She knew then that her twin sister was the missing part of her life. She asked the hospital for some information, on how she could look for the people who adopted her twin sister. After thoroughly searching and asking around, she managed to find the name of the woman who adopted her twin sister.

She wrote a letter to Mrs. Josepha Delos Santos and told her about her story and how she’s just found out that she has a twin sister and would like to meet her. Josepha wrote back telling her about Tala, her adopted daughter. She didn’t know that Tala has a twin; had she known that, she’d have adopted the two of them because she didn’t want them to be separated. She’d like to meet Luningning and she’d tell Tala about her and their story. So when Luningning went to their house, Tala opened the door and they both saw a mirror image of themselves. They knew then that their lives would be complete now, seeing and meeting their long lost twin sister.

so peaceful
human utopia
life on earth
peaceable
harmonious living for all
hallelujah!

hallelujah
it’s not late to dream
thank you, Lord
second chance
acceptance, equality
love and peace abound

love and peace
simple things we need
be grateful
and rejoice
we make our own utopia
taking part in it

taking part
don’t let it be harmed
our whole world
everything
send our gratifying love
hallelujah!

For: Creativity Challenge Day 3

Suffering Sun

sufferingsun

sun
scorching
too much suffering
giving too much heat to earth
hot
everyday blazing like fire
can’t help but give heat
sweltering
sun*

(c) ladyleemanila 2016

* Oddquain is a short, usually unrhymed poem consisting of seventeen syllables distributed 1, 3, 5, 7, 1 in five lines, developed by Glenda L. Hand.

oddquain butterflies – a “merged mirror oddquain” where the two stanzas of a mirror oddquain are merged together, one of the middle 1 syllable lines is dropped, resulting in one nine line stanza of the form 1-3-5-7-1-7-5-3-1. Please note that a oddquain butterfly is not a “oddquain” because it doesn’t have five lines, but it is “butterfly” made up of two oddquains that were merged together into one poem.

For: Prompt #1914 Visual Prompt of the Week – The Suffering Sun — The Writing Reader, Scorched

Other “scorched” posts:
https://ourrandomview.wordpress.com/2016/11/20/daily-prompt-scorched/
Daily Prompt: Scorched earth
Uncorked
https://passion912.wordpress.com/2016/11/20/burn-melt-die/
https://annapurani93.wordpress.com/2016/11/20/scorched/

Happy Sunday everyone!

Hello everyone! Happy Sunday! I thought I would never see you again, or blog for that matter. For a couple of days, I wasn’t able to access my blog site, can’t put new post, can’t read the other posts, can’t do anything…. wrote to wordpress and they said it appears that I have reached the maximum space provided and I should upgrade to Business plan, which is more expensive than the Premium plan that I have, and I have just renewed that Premium plan. Still unresolved, but I’m happy that I’m back to be with you all again.

Anyway, it’s a cold Sunday morning here in Bavaria. It has been raining the past couple of days, but never mind, I’m sharing with you some photos (bits and pieces of the past, as I cannot post any new photo). Cheers for now and enjoy your Sunday!

For: #MySundayPhoto – Fungi , ‘Xochitl and the Flowers’ (Sundays In My City), ALL SEASONS – THANKS on NOVEMBER 20 , I Want Your Smile #weeklysmile 46 reminder

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The Sandbox Writing Challenge #64 — Acceptance

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Have you ever tried to change someone in your life?
How’d that work out for ya?

I am reblogging one of my early posts 2 years ago, about the Filipino migrant workers, trying to understand our situation and just accepting it.

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Area of Expertise: Migration
Case Study: The Filipino Migrant Workers
The Country’s New Heroes

What makes people leave their countries to seek a better life? Is it because of demography, economics or politics? Great differences in trade between rich and poor countries have resulted to neo-colonialism. Adaptability of people has subjected man to a new form of subjugation. Migrants play a crucial role in filling up labour shortages, especially in the first world countries.

The Philippines, with the population of 83 million, have a fast declining mortality, increasing life expectancy and rapid population growth brought about by modernisation. They have numerous young labour force entrants. In the context of socio-cultural reality, migration in the Philippines is an issue of survival. Filipinos are leaving their country for economic reasons. These migrants are to be found in all highly-developed countries, but also in the Gulf, the new industrial countries, and Japan.

This case study will explore the different issues of migration and the Filipino migrant workers. The efficient management of the Philippine government, foreign affairs departments, institutional structures, migrant associations and advocacy groups concerned with migration requires a multitude of skilled specialists who combine their expertise to work out a solution. The experts are the Filipino migrants, with their varied skills, their determination, experience, remittances, technology transfer, new knowledge and attitudes.

The Philippines, as a lower middle income country, have about 8 million people abroad, close to 10 per cent of the population. To a large extent, it is an emigration country because of lack of rapid and incessant economic development. The Marcos dictatorship in the Philippines started a structured labour programme partly in the hope of lessening dissatisfaction with the plundering character of the regime and its incapability to ameliorate standards for the masses. The government sees labour export a vital and enduring aspect of economic policy and seeks to maximise it. Filipino migrant workers have become the Philippines’ largest sources of foreign exchange. In its development policy (2001-2004) under the Arroyo administration, the government now explicitly recognizes overseas employment as a “legitimate option for the country’s work force.” Thus, from managing the flow, the government now assertively promotes international labour migration as a growth stratagem, especially of the higher skilled, knowledge-based workers (Go, 2002).

Within the category of economic migrants, many highly-skilled Filipinos find work in the USA and Europe – often encountering employment downgrading (e.g. from doctor to nurse) in the process. Filipina domestic workers often have quite high educational eligibilities, which are wasted in their low-level jobs abroad. They are mostly employed in private homes where they are largely unprotected since the Philippine government often has no bilateral agreements with these countries. Some of them experience exploitation and abuse. Filipinos with middle-level and technical skills find work in construction, processing industries and other sectors in the Gulf. However, more Filipino overseas workers move to low-skilled jobs in a wide range of sectors, including seafaring. Seafarers often have low wages and poor conditions. Undocumented migration seems to be on the increase, because of the amalgamation of tighter controls and continuous demand for labour in receiving countries. Losing the expertise of all these people in the Philippines brings money, but doesn’t that also mean that you need expertise from outside if you lose yours by downgrading and outsourcing?

The transfer home of migrant earnings and savings is generally seen as the most important positive effect of migration in the Philippines. These remittances enable the migrants to build houses, send family members to school and pay for their parents’ medication. They help improve the country’s economy and sustain the local population. On top of remittances, if and when these migrants return to the country, they will bring with them greater amounts of training and experience contributing to social capital. There are also negative effects: the Philippines are losing some of their educated workers, like the doctors, nurses or engineers. In other words, the Philippines is experiencing brain-drain. Moreover, the benefits of government expenditures on education are not coming to support in the Philippines but rather in the USA or Europe. For example, because of the decreasing number of qualified medical workers, hundreds of hospitals in the Philippines have fully or partially closed, and medical care is disproportionately distributed, favouring industrialised cities and leaving rural areas with inadequate coverage (Lorenzo et al, 2007). Is it responsible policy for the USA or Europe to recruit Filipino medical workers and for the Philippine government to encourage emigration when these educated labourers are needed to support their own medical industry?

In acknowledging the diaspora, Filipino migrants have been redefined as bagong bayani, the country’s new heroes. Some means were taken to intensify their symbolic sanctioning, which incorporate presidential visits to communities overseas, the commemoration of “migrant worker days”, the launching of the Balikbayan status to bestow special rights (e.g. funds transfer, import of goods, reduction of import duties) for overseas Filipino, and a “Miss Overseas Philippines” beauty contest open to young women of Philippine origin, even if they are no longer citizens (Assis 2006 and Aguilar 1999). The Philippines has a powerful civil society sector, with many non-governmental organisations connected to the Church, to trade unions and political parties. Support groups concerned with migration appear to have a notable impact on the Philippine state, while associations related to welfare, migrant rights and women’s issues are significant in countries with Filipino migrant populations.

The Philippine Government devised a comprehensive institutional structure to manage emigration. The Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) was set up in 1977 to facilitate the well-being of migrants and their families left at home. A Commission on Filipino Overseas (CFO) was initiated in 1980 to improve the interests and welfare of emigrants. Its purpose is to cultivate the ties between emigrants and the Philippines. A third major institution is the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) within the Department of Labour, which recruits and selects overseas workers, as well as processing their documents and contracts, and providing pre-migration orientation courses. It manages licensing and supervises recruitment and placement agencies.

The hardest problem in the Philippines is setting up valuable systems to protect workers abroad. This is normally the responsibility of foreign affairs departments which appoint labour attaches and welfare officers at their consulates in labour-importing countries. The Philippine government takes measures to try to safeguard its citizens abroad, often in response to pressure from migrant associations and other civil society organisations. For example, the Migrant Workers and Overseas Filipino Act of 1995 was a direct mobilisation at the time of Flor Contemplacion case. This law, designed to protect Filipinos abroad, is summarised by Assis (Assis 2006). The government has entered into bilateral agreements with some countries. Many more countries need to be covered.

Attempts have also been made to establish international legal instruments to protect the rights of migrant workers. The principal ones are the International Labour Organisation (ILO) Conventions No. 97 of 1949 and No. 143 of 1975, and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Migrant Workers and Members of their Families of 1990. These instruments could do a good deal to enhance the circumstances of migrants, if states are willing to sign and implement them. Regrettably, that is not the case. The key instrument, the 1990 UN Convention, did not take effect until 2003, because few states are willing to ratify it. Even today, only 34 states signed up, mostly emigration countries. The unwillingness to have international authority of migration is because of the misgiving of recruiting countries: they think that regulation will increase the expenses of migrant labour and place social duties on receiving countries.

To summarise, the most significant development benefit of migration is mainly perceived to be the role of economic remittances in improving livelihoods. Others are seen in technology transfer and the return of the highly skilled and the new knowledge and attitudes by diasporas and returnees. It is right to say that the money they earn trickles into towns and villages, helping build houses and sending children to school. But the absence of so many productive and trained people – mothers and fathers, engineers and entrepreneurs – also demand a heavy toll.

In conclusion, long-term policies are needed that link the impending benefits of migration. There are many directions to take and important decisions to make. In the Philippines, it would mean giving up the idea of being the “producer of workers for the world”, which implies acceptance of permanent subjection in the international division of labour. It is remarkable how invisible the work of Filipinos in the global marketplace remains, and how little it is discussed in the first world countries. Instead, there need to be policies that unite political and economic reform at home with recognition of the prospective role of the Filipino migrants: to make visible the invisible Filipino overseas workers.

Works cited:
Aguilar, F.V.J. (1999). The triumph of instrumental citizenship? Migrations, identities and the nation-state in Southeast Asia. Asian Studies Review 23 3. Print.
Assis, M. (2006). International Migration, Migrant Empowerment and Development Prospects: the Philippines. Paper presented at the Conference of Migration and Development: Perspectives from the South.Bellagio, Italy, 10-13 July 2006. Print.
Castles, S. (2007). Comparing the Experience of Five Major Emigration Countries. Working Papers, Paper 7, International Migration Institute, James Martin 21st Century School, University of Oxford. Print.
Go, Stella P. (2002). Philippine international labour migration policy: its
evolution and future direction. Paper presented at the Workshop on Migration and Migration Policy in the Asia Pacific. University of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. February 28-March 1, 2002. Print.
Lorenzo, F.M.E., Galvez-Tan, J., Icamina, K. & Javier, L. (2007, June). Nurse Migration from a Source Country Perspective: Philippine Country Case Study. Health Services Research 42-3, 1406-1418. Print.

For: The Sandbox Writing Challenge #64 — Acceptance